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Tuesday, 30 September 2014

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Monday, 29 September 2014

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world of chemicals - online chemical trading portal, chemical store





via IFTTTworld of chemicals is a chemistry portal were business and consumers can buy, sell, trade and transport chemicals worldwide. Its a chemical directory listing worldwide chemical manufacturers, chemical suppliers and chemical traders

Friday, 26 September 2014

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Thursday, 25 September 2014

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Towards removing cancer cells completely, reducing recurrence


WASHINGTON DC, US: Cancerous brain tumors are notorious for growing back despite surgical attempts to remove them - and for leading to a dire prognosis for patients. But scientists are developing a new way to try to root out malignant cells during surgery so fewer or none get left behind to form new tumors. The method, reported in the journal ACS Nano, could someday vastly improve the outlook for patients.

Researcher Moritz F Kircher and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center point out that malignant brain tumors, particularly the kind known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), are among the toughest to beat. Although relatively rare, GBM is highly aggressive, and its cells multiply rapidly. Surgical removal is one of the main weapons doctors have to treat brain tumors. 

The problem is that currently, there’s no way to know if they have taken out all of the cancerous cells. And removing extra material “just in case” isn’t a good option in the brain, which controls so many critical processes. The techniques surgeons have at their disposal today are not accurate enough to identify all the cells that need to be excised. So Kircher’s team decided to develop a new method to fill that gap.

The researchers used a handheld device resembling a laser pointer that can detect “Raman nanoprobes” with very high accuracy. These nanoprobes are injected the day prior to the operation and go specifically to tumor cells, and not to normal brain cells. Using a handheld Raman scanner in a mouse model that mimics human GBM, the researchers successfully identified and removed all malignant cells in the rodents’ brains. Also, because the technique involves steps that have already made it to human testing for other purposes, the researchers conclude that it has the potential to move readily into clinical trials. Surgeons might be able to use the device in the future to treat other types of brain cancer, they say.


Thursday, 4 September 2014

Evonik to invest €2 billion in German operations

Evonik to invest €2 billion in German operations

Evonik to invest €2 billion in German operations

Evonik is investing in its German operations with new large-scale industrial plants, capacity expansions, and new research centers. The company plans to invest some €2 billion of the extensive investment programme it has developed as part of its growth strategy from 2012 to 2016 in Germany.

The Group is about to start up a new facility for functionalized polybutadienes in Marl, Evonik’s largest site worldwide with almost 7,000 employees. The material is mainly used for sealing compounds in double-glazed windows and for adhesives. The investment volume was in the mid double-digit million euro range. Important considerations for the site selection included proximity to key customers and the excellent infrastructure of the Marl Chemical Park.

A few weeks ago, a partial facility for crosslinking reagents, which have applications in solar panels and other industries, went into operation in Wesseling near Cologne. The investment volume was in the lower double-digit million euro range. The new production site was integrated into an existing facility, which produces one of the source materials.

Other Evonik investments include new capacities for C4-based products in Marl, the expanded specialty silicon production in Essen, and the construction of a new plant for polymeric dispersion agents at the same site. The company is also planning a number of smaller capacity expansions, including for PA12 in Marl. Furthermore, Evonik is investing in modernizing and maintaining the Group’s domestic sites.

“Germany has a strong and healthy industrial base. Our investments in Germany strengthen the international competitiveness of Evonik. Ensuring good investment conditions in Germany is the joint task of politics and business,” said Klaus Engel, Chairman of the Executive Board, Evonik.


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